The nichomacean ethics

No one tries to live well for the sake of some further goal; rather, being eudaimon is the highest end, and all subordinate goals—health, wealth, and other such resources—are sought because they promote well-being, not because they are what well-being consists in.

In one case you have an exaggerated regard for your own life despite being The nichomacean ethics as a coward and the likely humiliation that will bring and in the other you are too prepared to throw your life away and therefore not giving your life its proper value.

People will tell you that one of the problems with Aristotle and Plato is the fact that they could never conceive of a society in which there were no slaves — but one of the advantages of Plato is that he did think women could, and probably should, be educated.

Rather, it consists of knowing what is good but lacking the self-control to do good. But what of the remaining three: Aristotle says that while all the different things called good do not seem to have the same name by chance, it is perhaps better to "let go for now" because this attempt at precision "would be more at home in another type of philosophic inquiry", and would not seem to be helpful for discussing how particular humans should act, in the same way that doctors do not need to philosophize over the definition of health in order to treat each case.

And so too with good things; no one praises happiness as he does justice, but rather calls it blessed, as being something more divine and better.

Aristotle's Ethics

Practical reasoning always presupposes that one has some end, some goal one is trying to achieve; and the task of reasoning is to determine how that goal is to be accomplished.

Aristotle's reply is that one's virtuous activity will be to some extent diminished or defective, if one lacks an adequate supply of other goods b17— But they are also good and noble, and have each of these attributes in the highest degree, since the good man judges well about these attributes; his judgement is such as we have described.

How can we persuade a person in a state like this to change his ways? There seems to be also another irrational element in the soul-one which in a sense, however, shares in a rational principle. As Sachs points out,p.

Doing anything well requires virtue or excellence, and therefore living well consists in activities caused by the rational soul in accordance with virtue or excellence. In medicine this is health, in strategy victory, in architecture a house, in any other sphere something else, and in every action and pursuit the end; for it is for the sake of this that all men do whatever else they do.

But this question would perhaps be more appropriate to another inquiry; happiness seems, however, even if it is not god-sent but comes as a result of virtue and some process of learning or training, to be among the most godlike things; for that which is the prize and end of virtue seems to be the best thing in the world, and something godlike and blessed.

Distributive justice deals with the distribution of wealth or honors among a group of people and should be given according to merit. But it would seem that any one is capable of carrying on and articulating what has once been well outlined, and that time is a good discoverer or partner in such a work; to which facts the advances of the arts are due; for any one can add what is lacking.

The Nicomachean ethics

What Aristotle owes us, then, is an account of these traditional qualities that explains why they must play a central role in any well-lived life. Perhaps, however, some one might think it worth while to recognize this with a view to the goods that are attainable and achievable; for having this as a sort of pattern we shall know better the goods that are good for us, and if we know them shall attain them.

It requires caring about someone other than oneself, but does not demand some loss of care for oneself. Such people Aristotle calls evil kakos, phaulos.

This study is necessarily imprecise, since so much depends on particular circumstances. As an example of this we have the lawgivers of the Cretans and the Spartans, and any others of the kind that there may have been. A person who is not virtuous will often find his or her perceptions of what is most pleasant to be misleading.

There are bits of this that I found much more annoying this time around than I did when I read it years ago 30 years ago, now — yuck… how did that happen?

Chapters 6—12, First examples of moral virtues[ edit ] Aristotle now deals separately with some of the specific character virtues, in a form similar to the listing at the end of Book II, starting with courage and temperance. As Sachs points out, this is indeed what Plato depicts Socrates doing in his Gorgias.

But Aristotle points to a simplification in this idea of hitting a mean. His theory elucidates the nature of virtue, but what must be done on any particular occasion by a virtuous agent depends on the circumstances, and these vary so much from one occasion to another that there is no possibility of stating a series of rules, however complicated, that collectively solve every practical problem.

We began our discussion of these qualities in section 4. Being of "great soul" magnanimitythe virtue where someone would be truly deserving of the highest praise and have a correct attitude towards the honor this may involve.

But perhaps Aristotle disagrees, and refuses to accept this argumentative burden. Therefore, if there is only one final end, this will be what we are seeking, and if there are more than one, the most final of these will be what we are seeking. But it is also clear that he takes this motive to be compatible with a love of one's own good and a desire for one's own happiness.Nicomachean Ethics/5 good judge of that subject, and the man who has received an all-round education is a good judge in general.

Hence a young man is not a proper hearer of lectures on political science; for he is inexperienced in the actions that occur in life, but its discussions start from these and are. The Nicomachean Ethics is widely considered one of the most important historical philosophical works, and had an important impact upon the European Middle Ages, becoming one of the core works of medieval philosophy.

Nicomachean Ethics By Aristotle Written B.C.E Translated by W. D.

The Nicomachean Ethics

Ross: Table of Contents Book I: 1 Every art and every inquiry, and similarly every action and pursuit, is thought to aim at some good; and for this reason the good has rightly been declared to be that at which all things aim.

Overview. All human activities aim at some end that we consider good. Most activities are a means to a higher end. The highest human good, then, is that activity that is an end in itself. The Nicomachean Ethics (/ ˌ n ɪ k oʊ ˈ m æ k i ə n /; Ancient Greek: Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια) is the name normally given to Aristotle's best-known work on bistroriviere.com work, which plays a pre-eminent role in defining Aristotelian ethics, consists of ten books, originally separate scrolls, and is understood to be based on notes from his lectures at the Lyceum.

The Nicomachean Ethics (/ ˌ n ɪ k oʊ ˈ m æ k i ə n /; Ancient Greek: Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια) is the name normally given to Aristotle's best-known work on bistroriviere.com work, which plays a pre-eminent role in defining Aristotelian ethics, consists of ten books, originally separate scrolls, and is understood to be based on notes from his lectures at the Lyceum.

Download
The nichomacean ethics
Rated 3/5 based on 62 review